France, Germany 2017

Synopsis

In a small German town after Work War 1, Anna mourns daily at the grave of her fiancé Frantz, killed in battle in France. One day a young Frenchman, Adrien, also lays flowers at the grave. His presence so soon after the German defeat ignites passions.

Directors Statement

In a period obsessed with truth and transparency, I’ve been wanting to do a film about lies. I’ve always found lies to be exciting fodder for storytelling and filmmaking. So I was mulling it over when a friend told me about a play written by Maurice Rostand right afterWorldWar I.
I investigated further and learned that the play had been adapted for the cinema in 1931 by Ernst Lubitsch under the title BROKEN LULLABY. My first reaction was to scrap the idea. How could I top Lubitsch?! But seeing Lubitsch’s film reassured me. It’s similar to the play and takes the point of view of the young Frenchman, whereas I wanted to take the point of view of the young german woman. Lubitsch’s film is beautiful, his direction is admirable and highly inventive as always. But it’s the film of an American director of German descent who didn’t know a second world war was looming on the horizon. My approach, as a Frenchman who did not experience either of those two wars, was obviously going to be different.

Biography

"Internationally renowned auteur François Ozon is best known for films characterized by sharp satirical wit and an intense exploration of both human sexuality and of the bourgeoisie. While pursuing his Master’s degree in cinema at the University of Paris (under the instruction of teachers like Eric Rohmer and Joseph Morder), he shot dozens of films with his father’s Super 8 camera. Ozon studied film directing at La Femis, and made several short films, including “A Summer Dress”, awarded at Locarno and shown in Cannes in 1996. Ozon quickly made a name for himself as an emerging filmmaker to watch.
Ozon directed the thriller, “See the Sea” (1997), before making his first feature film a year later with the sassy and cruel “Sitcom”. He quickly developed a very personal style, on display in the fanciful “Criminal Lovers” (1990), and the fearlessly theatrical “Water Drops on Burning Rocks”, adapted from a play by Rainer Werner Fassbinder.
Throughout his prolific career, Ozon has collaborated with the most revered stars of French cinema including Catherine Deneuve, Isabelle Huppert, Fanny Ardant, and Emmanuelle Béart in “8 Women”, Charlotte Rampling in « Under the Sand » and “Swimming Pool”, Jeanne Moreau in "Time to Leave," and Kristin Scott Thomas in "In The House" among many others. His work spans many genres from social comedy ("Potiche") to romantic melodrama ("The New Girlfriend," staring Romain Duris and Anais Demoustier)."

Filmography:

2017 AMANT DOUBLE
2016 FRANTZ
2014 THE NEW GIRLFRIEND
2013 YOUNG & BEAUTIFUL
2012 IN THE HOUSE
2010 POTICHE
THE REFUGE
2008 RICKY
2007 ANGEL
2006 A CURTAIN RAISER (SHORT)
2005 TIME TO LEAVE
2004 5X2
2003 SWIMMING POOL
2002 8 WOMEN
2001 UNDER THE SAND
2000 WATER DROPS ON BURNING ROCKS
1999 CRIMINAL LOVERS
1998 SITCOM
1997 SEE THE SEA
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Cast & Crew

Directed by : François Ozon

Written by : François Ozon

Produced by : Eric and Nicolas Altmayer, Stefan Arndt, Uwe Schott

Director of Photography : Pascal Marty

Editor : Laure Gardette

Production Design : Michel Barthelemy

Costume Design : Pascaline Chavanne

Hair & Make up Artist : Lili Rameta

Composer : Philippe Rombi

Sound Design : Benoît Gargonne

Main Cast : Paula Beer (Anna), Pierre Niney (Adrien)

Nominations and Awards

  • European Screenwriter 2017
  • European Actress 2017
  • People's Choice Award 2017
  • EFA Feature Film Selection 2017